Great Advice On How To Best Train Your Dog

Great Advice On How To Best Train Your Dog

How can you get your dog to quit barking at everything that walks by or to stop jumping on the kids when they play in the back yard? Unfortunately, not everyone has a reasonably-priced dog trainer living next door. There are some things you can try on your own.

Create a regular schedule for your dog. Make sure his meals are at the same time each day, and walk him morning and night. Try to take him out for toilet breaks using a consistent routine. Dogs tend to thrive when they have a schedule that they can follow.

When training your dog, do it in short sessions, no more than fifteen to twenty minutes each session. This keeps your dog from becoming bored and uninterested in the training. More importantly, it ensures that your focus is entirely on training, which is vital to ensuring your dog’s success.

The best way to prevent your dog from barking excessively, is to make him more comfortable with whatever it is he barks at so frequently. Dogs bark at anything that scares of threatens them, so if you show your dog that the object of their fear is nothing to be afraid of, he’ll stop barking.

Go through the door before your dog, eat your own dinner first and always make sure that you win tug-of-war, by taking away the toy when you’re done. This all asserts that you are the pack leader and your dog is subordinate. This will help curb other obedience problems and help in other aspects of training because your dog realizes that he MUST do what you say. It’s how he’s hard-wired.

Start training your dog early. Many people believe that very young puppies are too young to learn. The reality is that even puppies as young as six weeks old are able to begin the basics of training, and starting early ensures that your puppy will have a strong foundation for more advanced training later.

Although it can be very difficult at times, patience should always be used with your dog. Keep in mind that your dog doesn’t know English like we do. Furthermore, it’s not a human being. An animal cannot grasp your thoughts and can only interpret your tone and nonverbal cues like gestures and facial expressions to some degree. Remain calm and take several breaks if you’re getting frustrated often during the training session.

You shouldn’t wait for bad behaviors to start to begin preemptively addressing them. Most new dog owners can expect at least one bad behavior to crop up during their time as a dog owner! Start addressing inappropriate soiling, destructive chewing and separation anxiety as if they’re likely to happen, and make sure your environment makes those things hard to occur!

When training your pooch, patience is a virtue. All dogs learn at their own pace, and getting frustrated with your pet often adds to the dog’s confusion. Avoid punishing your dog for misbehavior and offer rewards for good behavior instead. Dogs love treats, but you can also reinforce the desired behavior with love and affection.

Choose a consistent command or sound to use when training your dog not to bark. Make sure everyone in the household knows the command or sound to use and applies it consistently. Dogs learn better with consistency and when everyone in the dog’s household gives a consistent message, unwanted barking can be eliminated faster.

Allow your puppy to interact with other dogs. Puppies are often taken away from their siblings when they are quite young, before they have had the chance to learn how to naturally interact with other dogs. The majority of what a dog initially learns is through its family members. Once your puppy has all the appropriate shots, allow him to spend time with other dogs.

Your new dog should have more boundaries, not less! This is a crucial time in your dog’s life, as he is learning to live by your rules. This time is essential to bonding, so don’t skimp on training. Your dog will thank you for your diligence in great behavior for life.

Now that you have successfully graduated from training, you and your dog will be much happier. As you probably have discovered, there are a multitude of ways and means of training. Whichever you choose, either singularly or multiple accesses, you can now hold your head high knowing that your dog is well-behaved.

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